Coastal and Ocean Resource Economics
Projects
National Survey on Recreation and the Environment
Themes
National Ocean Service Social Science
Socioeconomic Impacts of Marine Reserves
Socioeconomic Monitoring Program for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary
Southern California Beach Valuation Projects

Artificial and Natural Reef Valuation
Spatial Trends in Coastal Socioeconomics (STICS)
Collections
Bibliographies/Benefits Transfer
Publications/Data Sets





Publications, Datasets, and Links

Publications
Datasets
Links

List of Core Publications

The list of documents below includes all CORE publications since 1996. These are available here in pdf format by clicking on the title. Earlier CORE publications will appear here soon.


Spatial Trends in Coastal Socioeconomics (STICS) Fact Sheet

Pacheco, Percy A., Peter C. Wiley, and Kristen M. Crossett, 2005. Silver Spring, MD: Special Projects, NOS, 4 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 1.2 mb)

Description: STICS web site offers, in one easy-to-use application, time series georeferenced demographic data from the U.S. Census Bureau for the last four decadal censuses (1970, 1980, 1990, and 2000) and the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) data (1969 to 2000). Analysis of income and employment data from this information can provide useful insights into the socioeconomic trends in the nation’s rapidly developing coastal regions, and can help coastal managers make more informed decisions regarding program priorities and delivery of services.

Keywords: demographic, economic, housing, watershed, time series, distribution, map, graph


Importance-Satisfaction Ratings Five-year Comparison, SPA & ER Use, and Socioeconomic and Ecological Monitoring Comparison of Results 1995-96 to 2000-01

Leeworthy, Vernon R., Peter C. Wiley, and Justin D. Hospital, 2004. Silver Spring, MD: Special Projects, NOS, 59 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 1.5 mb)

Fact Sheets

Description: This report addresses several issues in the Recreation and Tourism component of the Socioeconomic Research and Monitoring Program for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS). Included in the report is a five-year replication of importance and satisfaction ratings for 25 natural resource attributes, facilities, and services. Also included are measurements of use of the Sanctuary Preservation Areas (SPAs) and Ecological Reserves (ERs) or "no take zones" from the 2000-01 reef study. From the 2000-01 reef study we produced comparative socioeconomic profiles of reef users between SPA and ER users vs. non users. In the next section we compare ecological and socioeconomic monitoring results for the time period 1995-96 to 2000-01. And finally, we provide interpretations and conclusions of socioeconomic and ecological monitoring results using a conceptual model linking the economy and environment of the FKNMS.

Keywords: importance, satisfaction, sanctuary preservation area, ecological reserve, reef, coral reef, attributes


Socioeconomic Research and Monitoring Recommendations for Marine Protected Areas in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2003. Special Projects, NOS, 101 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 1.5 mb)

Description: On march 14-16, 2003, over 100 stakeholders and experts met to design a monitoring program for the marine protected areas proposed within the Channel islands national marine Sanctuary (CINMS). This report summarizes the recommendations of the workshop participants. Recommendations are presented in three funding scenarios: 1) low cost, 2) medium cost and 3) high cost. Each option and its contents are explained in the Summary of Recommendations section of the report.

Keywords: socioeconomic, research, monitoring, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, marine protected areas, impacts


Socioeconomic Study of Reefs in Southeast Florida, Final Report, October 19, 2001 as revised April 18, 2003

Johns, Grace M., Vernon R. Leeworthy, Frederick W. Bell, and Mark A. Bonn, 2003. Silver Spring, MD: Special Projects, NOS, 255 pp.

Executive Summary

Technical Appendix

Availability: Online (pdf, main report 2.2 mb, executive summary 64 kb, Technical Appendix 1.0 mb)

Description: This study employed extensive survey research to measure the economic contribution and the use values of artificial and natural reefs over the 12-month period of June 2000 to May 2001. The reef users surveyed were boaters who are recreational fishers (commercial fishers were not included), reef divers, reef snorkelers, and/or visitors viewing the reefs in glass-bottom boats.

Keywords: coral reefs, natural reefs, economic user values, sales, income, employment, scuba


Profiles and Economic Contribution: General Visitors to Broward County, Florida 2000-2001

Leeworthy V.R. and P.C. Wiley, 2003. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service. Silver Spring, MD: 37 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 100 kb)

Description: This report is based on a survey of the “General Visitor” population of Broward County conducted as part of the “Socioeconomic Study of Reefs in Southeast Florida”. In this report, we provide a profile of the “General Visitor” population of Broward County and provide estimates of the economic contribution that visitors make to the Broward County economy.

Keywords: coral reefs, natural reefs, economic user values, sales, income, employment, scuba


Profiles and Economic Contribution: General Visitors to Miami-Dade County, Florida 2000-2001

Leeworthy V.R. and P.C. Wiley, 2003. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service. Silver Spring, MD: 37 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 100 kb)

Description: This report is based on a survey of the “General Visitor” population of Miami-Dade County conducted as part of the “Socioeconomic Study of Reefs in Southeast Florida”. In this report, we provide a profile of the “General Visitor” population of Miami-Dade County and provide estimates of the economic contribution that visitors make to the Miami-Dade County economy.

Keywords: coral reefs, natural reefs, economic user values, sales, income, employment, scuba


Profiles and Economic Contribution: General Visitors to Monroe County, Florida 2000-2001

Leeworthy V.R. and P.C. Wiley, 2003. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service. Silver Spring, MD: 37 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 306 kb)

Description: This report is based on a survey of the “General Visitor” population of Monroe County conducted as part of the “Socioeconomic Study of Reefs in Southeast Florida”. In this report, we provide a profile of the “General Visitor” population of Monroe County and provide estimates of the economic contribution that visitors make to the Monroe County economy.

Keywords: coral reefs, natural reefs, economic user values, sales, income, employment, scuba


Profiles and Economic Contribution: General Visitors to Palm Beach County, Florida 2000-2001

Leeworthy V.R. and P.C. Wiley, 2003. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service. Silver Spring, MD: 37 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 100 kb)

Description: This report is based on a survey of the “General Visitor” population of Palm Beach County conducted as part of the “Socioeconomic Study of Reefs in Southeast Florida”. In this report, we provide a profile of the “General Visitor” population of Palm Beach County and provide estimates of the economic contribution that visitors make to the Palm Beach County economy.

Keywords: coral reefs, natural reefs, economic user values, sales, income, employment, scuba


Policy White Paper on Socioeconomic Study of Reefs in Southeast Florida

Bell, F.W., 2003. Florida State University, Department of Economics. 63 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 504 kb)

Description: This is an experiment to bring the Hazen and Sawyer (H/S) Report (Johns et. al. 2003) to bear on dealing with various policy issues, which were never addressed in the H/S baseline report. Quite simply, this is a user’s guide to how one can bring the baseline information to bear on current policy issues. In doing this, we shall also look at government budget support for developing and maintaining data, which can be used in baseline studies such as the H/S Report. This paper approach the formulation of the White Paper by first surveying, on a face-to-face basis, government officials on their reaction to the H/S Report. The purpose here was to see how non-economists reacted to concepts in the report and it’s usefulness for policy issues. The paper also examines how a slight tweaking of the report could make it more useful in a policy context.


Socioeconomic Impact Analysis of Marine Reserve Alternatives for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

Leeworthy, Vernon R. and Peter C. Wiley. 2002. Silver Spring, MD: Special Projects, NOS, 375 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 3.9 mb)

Description: This report provides a complete socioeconomic analysis for the proposed network of marine reserves (no-take areas) in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary. The report provides analyses for six alternative networks, and within each alternative, two jurisdictions (e.g., state and federal).

Keywords: marine reserve, impact analysis, Channel Islands, commercial fishing, recreation, consumptive, non-consumptive.


.

(top)


Proposed Tortugas 2000 Ecological Reserve Final Socioeconomic Impact Analysis: State and Federal Waters of the Proposed Alternative

Leeworthy, Vernon R. and Peter C. Wiley. 2000. Silver Spring, MD: Special Projects, NOS, 158 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 4.7 mb)

Description: This report is a final economic impact analysis of the proposed ecological reserve boundaries in the Tortugas Region of the Florid Keys National Marine Sanctuary. The purpose of this report is to provide detailed analyses of all alternatives condsidered by NOAA and the State of Florida, and to serve as detailed documentation of the socioeconomic analyses summarized in the Final Environmental Impact Statement.

Keywords: Ecological Reserve, socioeconomic, Tortugas, Florida, impact, Keys.


Economic Contribution of Recreating Visitors to the Florida Keys/Key West: Updates forYears 1996-97 and 1997-98

Leeworthy, Vernon R. and Patrick Vanasse. 1999. Silver Spring, MD: Special Projects, NOS, 20 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 276 kb)

Description: This report has been produced as part of the Socioeconomic Monitoring Program of the Flroida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. It is an effort to update specific baseline socioeconomic estiamtes presented in the 1995-1996 study entitled "Linking the Economy and Environment of the Florida Keys/Florida Bay.

Keywords: Economic contribution, Florida Keys, recreation, visitors, expenditures, tourism.


Visitor Profiles: Everglades National Park

Wiley, Peter C., and Vernon R. Leeworthy. 1998. Silver Spring, MD: SEA Division, NOS, 46 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 452 kb)

Description: This is the eighth report in a series developed as part of the project entitled "Linking the Economy and Environment of the Florida Keys/Florida Bay." It provides detailed profiles of visitors who accessed Florida Bay through Everglades National Park.

Keywords: Everglades, recreation, visitors, tourism, recreation, Florida.

(top)


Nonmarket Economic User Values of the Florida Keys/Key West

Leeworthy, Vernon R. and J. M. Bowker. 1997. Silver Spring, MD: SEA Division, NOS, 41 pp.

Executive Summary

Availability: Online (pdf, main report-224 kb, executive summary-20 kb)

Description: This report provides estimates of the nonmarket economic user values for recreating visitors to the Florida Keys, Key West who participated in natural resource-based activities. It is the fifth in a series that was developed as part of the project entitled "Linking the Economy and Environment of the Florida Keys/Florida Bay."

Keywords: nonmarket, value, recreation, Florida Keys, natural resource, consumer's surplus, travel cost.


A Socioeconomic Analysis of the Recreation Activities of Monroe County Residents in the Florida Keys/Key West

Leeworthy, Vernon R. and Peter C. Wiley. 1997. Silver Spring, MD: SEA Division, NOS, 49 pp.

Executive Summary

Availability: Online (pdf, main report-288 kb, executive summary-16 kb)

Description: This is the fourth in a series developed as part of the project entitled "Linking the Economy and Environment of the Florida Keys/Florida Bay." This report provides the results of the survey of residents of Monroe County.

Keywords: residents, recreation, Florida Keys, tourism, socioeconomic, Florida.


Technical Appendix: Sampling Methodologies and Estimation Methods Applied to the Survey of Monroe County Residents

Leeworthy, Vernon R. and Peter C. Wiley. 1997. Silver Spring, MD: SEA Division, NOS, 58 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 592 kb)

Description: This is the fourth in a series developed as part of the project entitled "Linking the Economy and Environment of the Florida Keys/Florida Bay." This report provides the results of the survey of residents of Monroe County.

Keywords: residents, recreation, Florida Keys, tourism, socioeconomic, Florida, methodology, technial appendix.

(top)


Visitor Profiles: Florida Keys/Key West

Leeworthy, Vernon R. and Peter C. Wiley. 1996. Silver Spring, MD: SEA Division, NOS, 159 pp.

Executive Summary

Availability: Online (pdf, main report-1.2 mb, executive Summary-172 kb)

Description: This report summarizes the results of the most extensive survey of visitors ever conducted. Included is information on visitation (number of visitors and number of days), demographics (place of residence, age, sex, race, ethnicity, income, education, employment), recreation activity participation and extent of use by region and season, and detailed spending profiles. Multi-dimensional views of visitors to the Florida Keys are presented. Dimensions include views by season, mode of access (e.g. auto, air and cruise ship), and domestic versus foreign visitors. Details reported demonstrate the richness and complexity of the information produced, and the potential for addressing many more detailed inquires to support business and management needs.

Keywords: tourist, Florida Keys, recreation, sanctuary, economics.


Economic Contribution of Recreating Visitors to the Florida Keys/Key West.

English, Donald B. K., Warren Kriesel, Vernon R. Leeworthy, and Peter C. Wiley. 1996. Silver Spring, MD: SEA Division, NOS, 22 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 204kb)

Description: Economic impact analyses of recreation sites are designed to answer the question: How much does an activity contribute to the local economy? Impacts are determined by three factors: the structure of the local economy, the amont and type of spending visitors do while on trips to the recreation site, and the total level of visitation. This report reports estimates of the economic impact (sales, employment and income) of visitor recreational uses of the Florida Keys and Florida Bay to Monroe County.

Keywords: economic impact, recreation, visitors, sales, employment, income, Florida Keys.

(top)


Importance and Satisfaction Ratings by Recreating Visitors to the Florida Keys/Key West

Leeworthy, Vernon R. and Peter C. Wiley. 1996. Silver Spring, MD: SEA Division, NOS, 23 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 288 kb)

Description: This report provides an easy to use and interpret analytical framework for assessing the ratings by visitors in terms of importance and satisfaction with 25 selected natural resource attributes, facilities, and services of the Florida Keys. For 11 of the 25 items, comparisons are made between visitors' current satisfaction ratings and their ratings of these items five years prior. Statistical tests were conducted to highlight significant differences.

Keywords: tourist, recreation, Florida Keys, satisfaction, sanctuary.


Technical Appendix: Sampling Methodologies and Estimation Methods Applied to the Florida Keys/Key West Visitors Surveys

Leeworthy, Vernon R. 1996. Silver Spring, MD: SEA Division, NOS, 170 pp.

Availability: Online (pdf, 788 kb)

Description: This document was prepared to provide detailed documentation on how various measurements were derived as reported for visitors to the Florida Keys, Key West in "Visitor Profiles: Florida Keys, Key West" (Leeworthy and Wiley 1996) and "Economic Contribution of Recreating Visitors to the Florida Keys, Key West" (English et al. 1996). This document is intended for researchers who want to do further analyses with the visitor data and may want to replicate the study in the future. Chapter 1 provides details on the sampling methodologies and methods for estimating the total number of visitors or person-trips (visits) and the number of person-days of visitation. Chapter 2 documents the sample weighting applied to both on-site and mailback samples. Chapter 3 provides details on the results of analyses conducted to determine the existence of nonresponse bias in the various mailback surveys. The corrections for nonresponse bias are included in the sample weighting explained in Chapter 2. Chapter 4 documents the methods used to estimate participation rates and total number of participants in each activity by season and region. It also documents how intensity of use was estimated for a select list of 39 activities by region and season. Intensity of use was defined in terms of the number of separate person-days of activity and the number of hours of activity. Results presented in the Visitor Profiles report were extended in this appendix to include estimates for all 39 activities, in all four regions, in both seasons, by substituting "best" estimates for items identified as having unreliable estimates of average days or hours per trip. Chapter 5 documents the methods used to estimate the economic contribution visitors had on Monroe County.

Keywords: methodologies, estimation, weighting, tourism, recreation, economics, Florida Keys.


Datasets

The CORE team is currently formatting our datasets to facilitate serving the data on this website. Data will be made available here as it becomes ready. To inquire about a specific dataset, please contact Peter Wiley.


Links

The following is list of those organization with which the CORE team has had a close working relationship, or from which CORE has acquired data/information.


Association of Environmental and Resource Economists

Founded in 1979, the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (AERE) was established as a means of exchanging ideas, stimulating research, and promoting graduate training in resource and environmental economics. Today, with a membership of over 1000 from more than thirty nations, AERE is a strong, active organization. AERE's members come from academic institutions, the public sector, and private industry. It draws from traditional economics, agricultural economics, forestry, and natural resource schools.

Damage Assessment and Restoration Program

NOAA's Damage Assessment and Restoration Program (DARP) conducts natural resource damage assessments and restoration of coastal and marine resources injured as a result of oil spills, releases of hazardous materials and ship groundings. The mission of DARP is to restore coastal and marine resources that have been injured by releases of oil or hazardous substances and to obtain compensation for the public's lost use and enjoyment of these resources. CORE maintains a close working relationship with the DARP economics group and many of CORE's valuation results are used in damage assessment cases.

The National Ocean Economics Project (NOEP)

The objective of the NOEP is to provide useful data on ocean related economic activities and resource trends to government, businesses and individuals to assist with investment and management decisions as they attempt to balance conservation and growth in coastal areas.

National Marine Sanctuaries Program

The mission of NOAA's National Marine Sanctuary Program is to serve as the trustee for the nation's system of marine protected areas, to conserve, protect, and enhance their biodiversity, ecological integrity and cultural legacy. Its goals are appropriate to the unique diversity contained within individual sites. They may include restoring and rebuilding marine habitats or ecosystems to their natural condition or monitoring and maintaining already healthy areas. One sanctuary may protect the breeding ground of humpback whales while another houses the remains of historical shipwrecks. Yet all share in common a growing circle of partners and volunteers who embrace the program's ocean ethic--to preserve and protect and respect our nation's marine environment.

Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

The most extensive living coral reef in the United States is adjacent to the 126 mile island chain of the Florida Keys. The Keys are located on the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, beginning just south of Key Biscayne and ending just 90 miles north of Cuba. These coral reefs are intimately linked to a marine ecosystem that supports one of the most unique and diverse assemblages of plants and animals in North America. The 2,800 square nautical mile Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS) surrounds the entire archipelago of the Florida Keys and includes the productive waters of Florida Bay, the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. Cultural resources are also contained within the sanctuary. The proximity of coral reefs to centuries old shipping routes has resulted in a high concentration of shipwrecks and an abundance of artifacts.

Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

The sanctuary is an area of national significance because of its exceptional natural beauty and resources. It encompasses the waters that surround Anacapa, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, San Miguel and Santa Barbara Islands, extending from mean high tide to six nautical miles offshore around each of the five islands. The sanctuary's primary goal is the protection of the natural and cultural resources contained within its boundaries.

Fisheries Centre

Our mission at the Fisheries Centre is to integrate research on ecological, social and economic aspects of the management of aquatic ecosystems and their resources.

Broward County, FL, Biological Resource Division

The mission of the Biological Resource Division is to protect, restore, and enhance the biological productivity, abundance, and diversity of marine, estuarine, freshwater, and terrestrial resources. This is accomplished through dredge and fill regulation, mitigation, a tree preservation ordinance, beach restoration, coral and artificial reef management, and beach erosion studies.

Human Dimensions of Fisheries Research Lab Texas A&M University

The Human Dimensions/Fisheries Lab at Texas A&M University specializes in social research on recreational fisheries. Problem solving research projects are completed for state and federal agencies in support of their resource management responsibilities (Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, National Marine Fisheries Service, Minerals Management Service among others) as well as for NGOs interested in fisheries conservation (the International Billfish Research and Conservation Foundation, Game Conservation International, Costa Rica Ecology Watch, and the Sport Fishing Institute among others). Recent studies have investigated use patterns and preferences of TPWD offshore artificial reef users, clientele of urban fishing programs, support for proposed changes in saltwater and freshwater fishing regulations, and the social and economic benefits associated with recreational fisheries in support of re-allocation decisions. Human dimensions research projects have been completed for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department annually since 1986.

University of Virginia Library, Geospatial & Statistical Data Center (Geostat)

Geostat supports a wide range of academic and scholarly activities through access to extensive collections of numeric and geospatial data files; computing facilities and software for data manipulation, research, and instruction; and a suite of Internet-accessible data extraction tools.


(top)

" "


noaa logo
Reviewed July 16, 2009 | Questions, Comments? Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Report Errors on this Page | Disclaimer | Site Information
NOAA’s National Ocean Service | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce

http://coastalsocioeconomics.noaa.gov/includes/econfoot.html | Web site owner: National Ocean Service